Issue 140

C-section May Double Risk of Child Obesity

Published Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-30

Cesarean section deliveries already linked to an increased risk of childhood asthma may double the risk of preschool child obesity, U.S. researchers say. Dr. Susanna Huh of Childrens Hospital in Boston and colleagues said the study involved 1,255 mother-and-child pairs. A Cesarean section delivery was associated with a doubling in the odds of obesity by the time the child was age three, irrespective of birth weight and after taking maternal weight and several other influential factors into account.
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IUDs, Implants Far More Effective at Preventing Pregnancy Than the Pill

Published Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-30

A large study of birth control methods in the U.S. found that women using pills, skin patches or vaginal rings were 20 times more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy than women who used intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants placed under the skin of the upper arm. Participants were provided with reversible contraception of their choice at no cost. The failure rates were highest among teenagers and young women.
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Research Examines Different Levels and Patterns of Prenatal Alcohol Consumption and Spontaneous Abortion

Published Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-30

"Consistent with our hypotheses, a significant relation between alcohol use [per] day across pregnancy . . . and spontaneous abortion (SAb) was identified in this selected sample of high-risk, urban African-American women," write the authors of an article published in the May issue of Alcohol. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy is a risk factor for many adverse outcomes.

Infant Mortality Rate Decreased Slightly from 2007-2008

Published Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-30

The U.S. infant mortality rate was 6.61 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2008, 2 percent lower than the rate of 6.75 in 2007. Infant mortality rates ranged from 4.51 per 1,000 live births for Asian or Pacific Islander mothers to 12.67 for non-Hispanic black mothers. The rate for non-Hispanic black women declined 5 percent from 2007 to 2008. Infant mortality was higher for male infants and infants born preterm or at low birthweight.

Women's Health Prevention Brief: The Built Environment

Published Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-30

CityMatCH & the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) have released a Women' s Health Prevention Brief that highlights the importance of addressing the built environment to improve maternal health and birth outcomes. This brief is the last in a series of issue briefs highlighting the priority areas (injury and chronic disease, health disparities, reproductive and maternal health, and healthy lifestyles) identified in the AMCHP/CityMatCH Women 's Preventive Health Framework. Previous briefs have focused on Women 's Mental Health and Women' s Health Equity.

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